Adventure Giveaway

 

GIVEAWAY TIME: Take DRMN BG on your next adventure.

Leave your next travel destination (near or far) in the comments below and we'll select 3 individuals to receive a free DRMN BG hat!

Send us a photo with your new hat on your adventure and we'll publish a short feature on our social media pages.

Update: Winners Announced:

Congrats to Kara B., Chelsey S. and Margaret D.

The Law of the Garbage Truck

How often do you let other people’s nonsense change your mood? Do you let a bad driver, rude waiter, curt boss, or an insensitive employee ruin your day? Unless you’re the Terminator, you’re probably set back on your heels. However, the mark of your success is how quickly you can refocus on what’s important in your life. 

Sixteen years ago I learned this lesson. And I learned it in the back of a New York City taxi cab. Here’s what happened. 

I hopped in a taxi, and we took off for Grand Central Station. We were driving in the right lane when all of a sudden, a black car jumped out of a parking space right in front of us. My taxi driver slammed on his brakes, the car skidded, the tires squealed, and at the very last moment our car stopped just one inch from the other car’s back-end. 

I couldn’t believe it. But then I couldn’t believe what happened next. The driver of the other car, the guy who almost caused a big accident, whipped his head around and he started yelling bad words at us. How do I know? Ask any New Yorker, some words in New York come with a special face. And he even threw in a one finger salute! I couldn’t believe it! 

But then here’s what really blew me away. My taxi driver just smiled and waved at the guy. And I mean, he was friendly. So, I said, “Why did you just do that!? This guy could have killed us!” And this is when my taxi driver told me what I now call, “The Law of the Garbage Truck®.” He said: 

“Many people are like garbage trucks. They run around full of garbage, full of frustration, full of anger, and full of disappointment. As their garbage piles up, they look for a place to dump it. And if you let them, they’ll dump it on you. So when someone wants to dump on you, don’t take it personally. Just smile, wave, wish them well, and move on. Believe me. You’ll be happier.” 

So I started thinking, how often do I let Garbage Trucks run right over me? And how often do I take their garbage and spread it to other people at work, at home, or on the street? It was then that I said, “I don’t want their garbage and I’m not going to spread it anymore.” 

I began to see Garbage Trucks. Like in the movie “The Sixth Sense,” the little boy said, “I see Dead People.” Well now “I see Garbage Trucks.” I see the load they’re carrying. I see them coming to dump it. And like my taxi driver, I don’t take it personally; I just smile, wave, wish them well, and I move on. 

One of my favorite football players of all time was Walter Payton. Every day on the football field, after being tackled, he would jump up as quickly as he hit the ground. He never dwelled on a hit. Payton was ready to make the next play his best. Over the years the best players from around the world in every sport have played this way: Muhammad Ali, Nadia Comaneci, Bjorn Borg, Chris Evert, Michael Jordan, Jackie Robinson, and Pele are just some of those players. And the most inspiring leaders have lived this way: Nelson Mandela, Mother Theresa, Gandhi, and Martin Luther King. 

See, Roy Baumeister, a psychology researcher from Florida State University, found in his extensive research that you remember bad things more often than good things in your life. You store the bad memories more easily, and you recall them more frequently. 

So the odds are against you when a Garbage Truck comes your way. But when you follow The Law of the Garbage Truck®, you take back control of your life. You make room for the good by letting go of the bad. 

The best leaders know that they have to be ready for their next meeting. The best sales people know that they have to be ready for their next client. And the best parents know that they have to be ready to greet their children with hugs and kisses, no matter how many garbage trucks they might have faced that day. All of us know that we have to be fully present, and at our best for the people we care about. 

The bottom line is that successful people do not let Garbage Trucks take over their lives. 

What about you? What would happen in your life, starting today, if you let more garbage trucks pass you by? 

Here’s my bet: You’ll be happier. 

David J. Pollay 

David J. Pollay is an acclaimed speaker and the creator and author of the international phenomenon, The Law of the Garbage Truck. You can find his best-selling book, The Law of the Garbage Truck: How to Stop People from Dumping On You

The Final 10%

The following article is written by Chance Scoggins from http://www.chancescoggins.com/

Do you have a hundred plates spinning in the air?

Are you expecting them to come crashing down any minute? 

Are you buckling under the weight of your responsibility? 

Are you losing sleep while your mind races over all that remains undone? 

Are you neglecting your family, friends and yourself? 

Are you overwhelmed?  

It was easy for me to make that list of questions.  I just thought about how I’ve felt on my hardest days during the last 6 months.   

At the beginning of this year, I took on a large project for a client.  I knew going in that it would be a great challenge.  I expected it to dominate my time and attention.  I knew it would require me to bring my A-game.  But I was excited by the challenge, and invigorated by the possibility of what a job well done would mean personally, professionally and for the sake of others. 

I made a step by step plan, trying to predict every potential road block ahead.  But I fooled myself into thinking that if I followed it and did my best, I’d arrive at the end of this project, unscathed.  Needless to say, life happened, as it always does, and over time, there were dozens of obstacles and distractions I couldn’t have named beforehand.  I had imagined reaching the end would feel something like crossing a finish line in victory, making my way to a podium and collecting a medal.  It actually feels more like sliding into home, skinning my knee and limping back to the bench. 

And you know what?  I wouldn’t have it any other way.

I put my heart into every piece of this project that I touched.  I offered something that no one else in the world could offer it.  My work is worthy of my name.  I gave my best.  But, there was a time when I almost didn’t care anymore – and that’s why I’m writing today.  I learned something in this process that I’m not sure I’d truly known before.   

The final 10% is designed to show you what you’re made of. 

If you’re a smart and resourceful person, your existing ability is enough to get you through the first 90% of most things you do. It’s that final ten percent – the last little bit before you reach a big goal – where you’re really tested.  You’ve come so far.  You’ve given so much.  The initial excitement has worn off.  Your adrenaline is used up.  You’re tired and nearing empty.  You can see the end in sight.  But then, seemingly out of nowhere, obstacles and distractions come at you from every side.  You find that you’re not as close as you thought you were, and you begin to wonder if you’ve got enough left in you to finish well. 

Welcome to the final 10%.  This is where you find something in yourself that wasn’t there before.  This is how you become the next and better version of yourself. This is when you grow.   

Few people finish well when things get tougher than they expected.  Out of fatigue or maybe even laziness, they grow complacent and lower the bar.  They look for short cuts.  They cut corners.  And in the process, after having come so far and done so much hard work, they fall short of what they’re capable of and created for.  They settle, and sacrifice the glory of bringing their whole selves to their goal or cause. 

Let it never again be said of you and me.   

If you’re tired – keep digging deep. 

If you’re overwhelmed – do the next right thing.  

If you’re tempted to lower the bar – don’t.  Do what you said you’d do. 

Better yet, do more than you said you’d do – and do it with a smile on your face.  

Inspire others to dig deeper in themselves.

This is what you were made for. 

After six months of some of the hardest work I’ve ever taken on, I’m on the other side.  My goal really is in sight.  I’m almost done and I’m beginning to taste the fruit of my labor. It’s sweeter than I’d imagined.  It’s worth every single bit of the trouble and sacrifice.  Having so recently stood where some of you stand today, I want to share with you what I needed to hear myself, most especially during my final ten percent.   

You will make it. 

You can do this. 

It will be worth your effort and sacrifice. 

Great things are ahead of you… for you, and for others because of you. 

Don’t give up. 

Keep going.  

The final 10% will make or break you.  Finish well.  Go do what only you can do, and do it all the way.

Opinions

"Opinion is really the lowest form of human knowledge. It requires no accountability, no understanding. The highest form of knowledge… is empathy, for it requires us to suspend our egos and live in another’s world. It requires profound purpose larger than the self kind of understanding." 

Bill Bullard

How to Build and Maintain Credibility as a Leader

Excerpt From: SET THE STANDARD 

For Leaders to be credible, they must know "their stuff." Ethics speak louder than words, so therefore every Leader needs to learn how to: 

Delegate appropriately. 

Tame the ego. 

Stay in control of your emotions. 

Remain logical, reasonable and consistent. 

Honor confidences. 

Help people avoid embarrassment. 

Avoid threatening or being threatened. 

Keep your sense of humor while striving for perfection. 

And remember; always try to be the boss you wish you had! 

Be A Legendary Leader Today...Walk the Talk! 

Culture eats vision for Lunch and Leadership starts with you! You are either Coaching culture or you are allowing it to happen, there is no in-between". - The Legacy Builder 

As leaders let's make where we work AWESOME! 

Make Someone Feel Good Today

The following comes from WhatWillMatter.com.

“It’s true I am only one, but I am one and the fact that I cannot do everything will not prevent me from doing what I can do.” – Edward Everett Hale

What can be more meaningful and fulfilling than making a positive difference in this world by making a difference in the lives we touch? It is the essence of living a life that matter. As the following story illustrates it is so much easier than it we might think and its something we all can do every day of the year. 

Marta was a hard-working single mother. When her minister sermonized about “living a life that matters,” she worried that working to raise her kids and going to church wasn’t enough. So, on the bus to work she made a list of other jobs she could do and volunteer work she could try. 

Sylvia, an elderly woman, saw the worry on Marta’s face and asked what was wrong. Marta explained her problem. Sylvia said, “Oh my, did your minister say you weren’t doing enough?” 

“No,” Marta said, “But I know I’m not living a life that matters and i want to.” 

“You don’t have to change jobs or do more volunteer work,” Sylvia consoled her. “It’s enough that you’re a good mother. But if you want to do more, think about what you can do while doing what you already do. It’s not about what you do, but how you do it.” 

“You don’t understand,” Marta said. “I sell hamburgers. How do I make that significant?” 

“How many people do you deal with every day?” Sylvia asked. 

“Two to three hundred.” 

“Well, what if you set out to cheer, encourage, teach or inspire as many of those people as you could? A compliment, a bit of advice, a cheerful hello or a warm smile can start a chain reaction that lights up lives like an endless string of Christmas bulbs.” 

“But that’s just being nice,” Marta protested. 

“Right,” said Sylvia, “Niceness can change lives.” 

Marta looked at the old woman. “What do you do?” 

“I was a housekeeper until I retired,” Sylvia said. “Now I just ride the bus talking to people.” 

Sylvia made a difference in Marta’s life simply by helping her look at things differently so the next day at work she went out of her way to encourage others with a kind word. Her goal was to make someone feel good about themselves and smile. She particularly began to enjoy the moments when someone actually said thank you and she got better at it. 

Toward the end of the first day of her campaign to make a difference through kindness she saw a woman in line holding a baby in one arm and struggling to keep her two other children in control. She was clearly frazzled when she got to Marta’s window to order her food. Marta said, “I couldn’t help but notice that you are an extraordinary mother. It is so clear you are worn out but your love for your children and your consideration for others is amazing. Thank You.” 

The mom’s face changed almost instantly and she replied, “I can’t tell you how much that means to me. You have made my day.” After another moment she added, “no you didn’t just make my day, you affirmed my life. Thank you.” 

Marta was filled with a sense of gratitude and she couldn’t wait to tell Sylvia on the bus ride home. 

“People don’t always remember what you say or even what you do, but they always remember how you made them feel.” – Maya Angelou
 

An alternative to waiting for motivation

“Success isn’t a result of spontaneous combustion.  You must set yourself on fire.”
-- Arnold H. Glasow


We’ve talked often in these emails about the importance of having a consistent approach. Anyone can have good performances, or even great ones. But it is the person, or company, that gives a quality performance day in and day out that will have the most success.
 
One of the keys to being able to do that is not waiting for motivation before you act. It’s great to be motivated to do something, but you cannot rely on it. Think about how often you’ve heard yourself say, “I just can’t get motivated to do XXXXX.”
 
Want to get motivated? Then don’t wait for it. Act first. Get moving on your project or your workout, or whatever your task is and the motivation will follow. An object in motion wants to stay in motion. The same is true for people.
 
Today, stop waiting for motivation to get you moving and instead start moving and watch the motivation follow you.
 
Win Your Day!
Steve Gilbert
 
*If you are not on Steve Gilbert’s Win Your Day! email list, but would like to be added, please email him atwinyourday@gmail.com.

Do You Have Daily Reminders?

“Despite living in an increasingly digital world, there are a few things I still like to keep as physical reminders. So every time I see an exhibition, I make a pit stop at the museum gift shop to buy a postcard of something that inspired me.”
-- Ruzwana Bashir


When I write these daily messages I try my best to keep them short, because most of you are very busy and do not have time to read long emails every morning regardless of whether you like them or not.
 
I also strive to keep them simple, because what these messages are meant to be are reminders. A lot of the concepts that I talk about you already know, but the value of the email is in calling them to your attention, because we all tend to be distracted by the day-in day-out stresses of your life.
 
It is important to find ways to remind yourself throughout the day of what it is that’s important to you and what you have set out to accomplish. Otherwise you will be at the mercy of circumstances and other people. For example, I carry a small glass stone with the word "Joy" on it in my pocket. It's a way of both honoring my mom, Joy, who passed away a few months ago, as well as reminding myself that I want to be joyful in how I approach my life.
 
Today, find ways to remind yourself of how you want to be. What mindset in the morning did you want to live from today? What did you say your priorities would be? Make sure to keep them front and center.
 
Win Your Day!
Steve Gilbert
 
*If you are not on Steve Gilbert’s Win Your Day! email list, but would like to be added, please email him at winyourday@gmail.com.

Can You Play Badly Well?

"The worse you're performing, the more you must work mentally and emotionally. The greatest and toughest art in golf is playing badly well. All the true greats have been masters at it." 
-- Jack Nicklaus

There's no debating Jack Nicklaus had tremendous talent when it came to the game of golf. His 18 wins in golf's major events stands as a record that looks unbeatable at the moment. 

Nicklaus was able to get the most from his talent, though, because of a mental grittiness that we can all learn from. When things didn't go well for him on the golf course, he was able to
manage that. He didn't allow his frustration to spiral from one hole to the next. 

Think for a minute about the power in that kind of mindset. When something doesn't go the way you wanted it to today -- and we all know that things don't go exactly the way we planned or hoped they would -- how are you going to respond? Will you allow a negative performance or outcome in the morning to spill over into the rest of your day? Or will you find a way to manage your emotions and play badly well? 

Today, work on developing the ability to not let single events cascade into the rest of your day. Accept that you might not be feeling your best, or at your best and rather than be frustrated or angry about it, find a way to get through your tasks as best you can. 

Win Your Day! 
Steve Gilbert
 

Seven Things to Do

“Four things a man must learn to do
If he would make his life more true;
To think without confusion clearly,
To love his fellow man sincerely,
To act from honest motives purely,
To trust in God and Heaven securely.”
-- Rev. Henry Van Dyke


Those words were written on a card that legendary basketball coach John Wooden’s father, Joshua, gave him when he graduated from grade school.
 
On the other side his father wrote “Seven Things to Do”
 
1. Be true to yourself.
2. Help others.
3. Make each day your masterpiece.
4. Drink deeply from good books, especially the Bible.
5. Make friendship a fine art.
6. Build a shelter against a rainy day.
7. Pray for guidance and count and give thanks for your blessings every day.
 
Wooden was handed the card in the 1920s, but the words on them are timeless.
 
Win Your Day!
Steve Gilbert
 
*If you are not on Steve Gilbert’s Win Your Day! email list, but would like to be added, please email him at winyourday@gmail.com.

The Practice of Possibility

I'm currently reading "The Art of Possibility" by Roz and Benjamin Zander

In the book the Zanders identify several practices designed to bring about change in one's personal and professional life. 

One of the things I love about the book is that the Harvard Business School asked a couple of artists to write a book for business leaders. Talk about pushing the possibility lever. 

If today finds you facing a challenge you have a choice. To quote the Zanders ... "In the face of difficulty, we can despair, get angry ... or choose possibility. 

Let's assume you choose possibility. If you're like me it will not come easy. You will most likely need to practice because our default mode is usually anger or despair. 

Spend time today using your imagination. Make a list of a few possibilities and then take a step toward one of them. Here are a couple of questions to help you think. 

* What would I do to achieve the same results if I could only work half the number of hours I typically work? 
* How would I attempt to achieve the same results if my current budget were cut in half? 
* If I could add 3 new positions to my staff what would they be? 
* What three team members in my organization could be developed into leaders? 

Possibility is a really powerful concept. For a leader it is the difference between what is and what can be. If you'll spend time practicing possibility thinking it will propel you from here to there. 
________________________________

If you'll spend time practicing possibility thinking it will propel you from here to there. 
________________________________

Leadership Begins at Home, 

Randy Gravitt

Win Your Day

“You have to train your brain to be positive just like you work out your body.” 
-- Shawn Achor


Brothers Bert and John Jacobs did not have the easiest of lives growing up. Their father had a harsh temper -- the result the brothers say of a losing the use of his right hand in a car accident. 

There was a shining light in their house, though -- their mother, Joan. 

At dinner each night Joan would ask each of her six kids to tell her about something good that happened that day. 

"As simple as mom's words were, they changed the energy in the room," the brothers wrote. "Before we knew it, we were all riffing on the best, funniest, or most bizarre part of our day. She showed us that optimism is a courageous choice you can make every day, especially in the face of adversity." 

My late father, Bob Gilbert, who was an elementary school principal, used to do the same thing with his teachers. He would slip a note to random teachers each day that said “What’s good?” 

When Bert and John grew up they used their mother’s inspiration to start a t-shirt company. It was a tough go at first as they literally sold the shirts out of their car. But they remembered their mother’s lesson and persevered. Their company “Life is Good” is worth $100 million now. 

Today, start a routine where each day you ask yourself, “What’s good?” Ask your kids that question every night when you tuck them in. Ask your spouse or significant other every night before you go to bed. Keep a journal where at the end of each day you write about at least one thing that was good about the day. 

And what about those days when you think nothing good happened? Well, those are the days when this exercise is most important. If you look hard enough you’ll find something and in the process you’ll be training your brain to see the good each day.

Win Your Day! 
Steve Gilbert 

Why You've Got To Be An Over-Believer

March Madness concluded this weekend with the NCAA Basketball Final Four. The saying during tournament play is "Survive and Advance." That's also good life advice. How do champions survive, advance and become champions? Many would say it happens on the court in the previous rounds. Others would say they earn their way into the tournament during their conference tournaments. I'm telling you their victories happened way before that. Your success also happens way before it actually manifests itself too. You go there in your mind first and then you go there physically.

Years ago, legendary North Carolina State basketball coach Jim Valvano would devote the first day of practice every season to doing something very unorthodox, maybe even downright weird by most standards. There were no basketballs, no drills, no scrimmaging; just a ladder, and a pair of scissors. Valvano would have his players practice cutting down the nets, to simulate what they would do when they won the national championship. Not if - when. What is the benefit of practicing this? He wanted his players to paint a picture in their minds of seeing themselves as winners and to believe in themselves even if no one else did. It's not enough to tell your team to "visualize it"; you've got to actually commit to practicing it in a hands on way to make it real. They even filmed it and would watch replays of it throughout the season.

In 1983 his team turned this preseason vision into reality six months later when they won the NCAA Championship. They were 50 to 1 underdogs, but aren't we all?

His belief in his team was instilled in him by his family, specifically his father. When he became a college head coach Valvano told his dad he was going to win a national championship. While he was home visiting his parents, Valvano's dad called him up to the bedroom to show him a suitcase. He explained to his son that his bag was packed, he was ready for the day his son would go to and win the national championships. He would be there, his bag was already packed.

This is perhaps the greatest gift we can give people we lead, the gift of belief. 

When anyone achieves great success, you can rest assured they had to overcome great adversity. Our trials make our triumphs that much sweeter. You might be really far away from your goal but creating a shared vision gives your team a very vivid memory to carry with them and focus their mind on triumph during their trials.

I was recently reminded of this when I interviewed the band Parmalee. Parmalee is a family band consisting of brothers Matt and Scott Thomas, cousin Barry Knox and longtime friend Josh McSwain. They grew up about an hour down route 64 from NC State's campus in Parmele, N.C. (Population: 276) What are the odds of a family band making it from Parmele to the heights of fame in Nashville? To quote Parmalee bassist, Barry Knox "probably less than a five percent chance". Five percent is also the same odds their drummer Scott Thomas was given to survive September of 2010.

In September 2010, Parmalee was involved in an attempted robbery and shootout on its RV outside a club they had just played. The incident came on the eve of Parmalee traveling to Nashville for a showcase with Stoney Creek Records. Scott was shot three times and was airlifted to a hospital in Charlotte, NC. He was given a 5% chance of life by doctors, but miraculously survived after spending 35 days in the hospital, 10 of which he spent in a coma.

When I asked them about going through this adversity they all framed it as focusing on the 5% chance of survival not the 95% chance of death. Why? Because they maintained their belief and vision which enabled them to always bet on themselves in spite of the evidence. Your people need you to believe in them and have high expectations too. Why? Because when others believe in you, it becomes harder for you to doubt yourself.

"I think we've always looked at it from the stadium backward.

We always thought big, and it's really cool to be able to get onstage now and see the amount of people, and be able to have that energy." 

-Matt Thomas

At one point the band's credit card debt was over $100,000. Matt Thomas commented that his debt was at a whopping 36% interest rate. They didn't give up, maintained their belief and kept plugging away. Scott did indeed recover, the band made it to Nashville, landed a contract with Stoney Creek and now have a number one hit and two top ten songs to their credit. The lead single, "Roots" from their upcoming sophomore album will impact Country radio on Monday, May 2. Parmalee didn't survive and advance because they're simply over-achievers, they've won because they're first and foremost over-believers.

Can you maintain belief in spite of the current evidence? Your belief may not run the world but it sure does run your world.

P.S. If you're a new reader or seeing this for the first time, Coach Randall (the main character from my book Seeds of Success) is running for president and just received this glowing endorsement from Al Gore. :-)

Lead with Your Strengths

Vince Lombardi once hosted a four day football clinic for coaches and devoted two full days to just one play, the Power Sweep. If you know football history Vince Lombardi and the Green Bay Packers won five league championships, including the first two Super Bowls because of that one play.

The Utah Jazz only ran eight plays during the years they were an NBA powerhouse in the 90's. Carl Malone and John Stockton ran the pick and roll so well they were almost unstoppable. The Utah Jazz had a culture of execution.

I recently met one of Canada's top military strategist and historian, Dr. Angelo Caravaggio who told me that Alexander the Great won his three major battles because of one maneuver; a right flank.

In-N-Out Burger has become wildly successful and created a huge cult following with just a few menu items that they do amazingly well.

Apple has made billions of dollars with just a few products that are wonderfully designed and easy to use.

In a world that says you have to provide more choices, create more products, run hundreds of plays and be everything to everyone if you want to be successful, there is something very powerful about simplicity, clarity and leading with your strengths.

There are a million things you can choose to do each day. There are many of the latest and greatest fads that you can partake in. You possess many weaknesses that you can choose to focus on. But I want you to know that you and your team will be at your best when you develop and lead with your strengths.

Everyone including Green Bay's competition knew the Power Sweep was coming and yet they still couldn't stop it. Coach Lombardi and his team developed a strength that became an unstoppable force of positive momentum and so will you when you identify, develop and lead with your strengths.

What are your strengths? What do you do best? What are your best selling products?

Where can you be the strongest? What do you want to become known for?

Once you know the answers to these questions then you'll want to spend your time, energy, focus, practice and effort simplifying, mastering the fundamentals, developing your strengths and creating a culture of execution.

The more time you spend developing and leading with your strengths the more you will become known for them. The stronger your strengths become the greater impact you will have.

The world doesn't need another average business. The world doesn't need an average you. The world needs your BEST YOU. And when you lead with your strengths you can share YOUR BEST with the world.

-Jon

Credit Jon Gordon of www.JonGordon.com

Daily Routines of Highly Productive People

I often find interesting topics of discussion on Quora. Here is one on the Daily Routines of Highly Productive People. There are a plethora of intriguing answers including this one by Kevin Espiritu. Kevin performed a study and found that "there was nearly no consistency to the routines and habits of productive, successful people. They seemed to do what worked for them, using what they had and working around their weaknesses."

Here are a few daily routines of highly productive and successful people from Kevin’s response:

Charlie Munger

I have absolutely devoured Poor Charlie's Almanack, which I would consider a must-read for anyone who wants to delve into the life of a very original thinker. Despite this, I haven't found much on Charlie's actual routines, at least not later in life. From what I can tell, his routine is just, "Read. A lot." But this excerpt from The Snowball paints an illuminating picture of Munger's outlook early in life: 


Charlie, as a very young lawyer, was probably getting $20 an hour. He thought to himself, ‘Who’s my most valuable client?’ And he decided it was himself. So he decided to sell himself an hour each day. He did it early in the morning, working on these construction projects and real estate deals. Everybody should do this, be the client, and then work for other people, too, and sell yourself an hour a day.
________________________________________
Michael Lewis

The author of some of my personal favorite reads (The Big Short, Liar's Poker,Moneyball), seems to buck a lot of common writer's routines.  I couldn't find anything on his morning routine in particular, but this excerpt from The New New Journalism is pretty fascinating: 

How do you begin writing?


Fitfully. I'll write something, but it won't be the beginning or the middle or the end -- I'm just getting an idea out on the page. Then, as the words accumulate, I start thinking about how they need to be organized.

What is in front of you when you begin to write?


Nothing, except for the computer screen. I write from memory, as if I were writing a novel. When I finish a day's writing I go back and check the text against my notes to make sure the facts and quotes are right, and that I haven't inadvertently made anything up. The quotes are almost always accurate because by that point I've gone over the material so many times in my head.

Is there any time of day you like to write?


I've always written best very early in the morning and very late at night. I write very little in the middle of the day. If I do any work in the middle of the day, it is editing what I've written that morning.

What would your ideal writing day look like?


Left to my own devices, with no family, I'd start writing at seven p.m. and stop at four a.m. That is the way I used to write. I liked to get ahead of everybody. I'd think to myself, "I'm starting tomorrow's workday, tonight!" Late nights are wonderfully tranquil. No phone calls, no interruptions. I like the feeling of knowing that nobody is trying to reach me.

Is there anywhere you need to be in order to write?

No, I've written in every conceivable circumstance. I like writing in my office, which is an old redwood cabin about a hundred yards from my house in Berkeley. It has a kitchen, a little bedroom, a bathroom, and a living room, which I use as as study. But I've written in awful enough situations that I know that the quality of the prose doesn't depend on the circumstance in which it is composed. I don't believe the muse visits you. I believe that you visit the muse. If you wait for that "perfect moment" you're not going to be very productive.
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Charles Darwin

The famed scientist and author of the absolute titan of scientific literature The Origin of Species had quite an involved and interesting routine. His wife Emma seemed to dote on him and care for him quite a bit as the day chugged along. 

Have a look: 

•    7am: Rose and took a short walk.
•    7:45am: Breakfast alone.
•    8-9:30am: Worked in his study; he considered this his best working time.
•    9:30-10:30am: Went to drawing-room and read his letters, followed by reading aloud of family letters.
•    10:30am-12pm: Returned to study, which period he considered the end of his working day. Walk, starting with visit to greenhouse, then round the sandwalk, the number of times depending on his health, usually alone or with a dog.
•    12:45pm: Lunch with whole family, which was his main meal of the day. After lunch read The Times and answered his letters.
•    3pm: Rested in his bedroom on the sofa and smoked a cigarette, listened to a novel or other light literature read by Emma Darwin.
•    4pm: Walked, usually round sandwalk, sometimes farther afield and sometimes in company.
•    4:30-5:30pm: Worked in study, clearing up matters of the day.
•    6pm: Rested again in bedroom with Emma reading aloud.
•    7:30pm: Light high tea while the family dined. In late years never stayed in the dining room with the men, but retired to the drawing-room with the ladies. If no guests were present, he played two games of backgammon with Emma, usually followed by reading to himself, then Emma played the piano, followed by reading aloud.
•    10pm: Left the drawing-room and usually in bed by 10:30, but slept badly.
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Winston Churchill

Churchill's routine is so odd that I decided to share his entire day:

•    7:30am: Woke up, ate breakfast, and read in bed. Dictated to secretaries for a few hours, still in bed.
•    11am: Bathed and took a walk around the garden. Drank whiskey and soda.
•    1pm: Joined guests and family for a lunch. Drank champagne.
•    5pm-6:30pm: Got up, bathed and got ready for dinner.
•    8pm-??: Had a long dinner, sometimes not ending until after midnight.
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P.G. Wodehouse

From Wodehouse: A Life (I have underlined the important parts of his routine):


On most days, he would get up at half past seven, go out onto the porch at the back door, and do the "daily dozen" sequence of calisthenic exercises he had performed every day since 1920. While Ethel, always a late riser, was still upstairs in bed, Wodehouse would prepare his regular breakfast -- toast and honey or marmalade, a slice of coffee cake and a mug of tea -- and, as part of the early morning routine, he would read a "breakfast book," for example a Rex Stout or Ngaio Marsh mystery. Then he would light the first pipe of the day, crumbling the cigars Peter Schwed sent him into the bowl in preference to pipe tobacco. At nine o'clock, after a short walk with some of the dogs, he would retire to his study, a spacious, pine-clad room overlooking the garden, for the morning's work. His writing methods had not changed in years. He would sit and brood in a favourite armchair, draft a paragraph or two in pencil, then move to the typewriter.
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Benjamin Franklin

Ben Franklin a total boss. I'm reading Benjamin Franklin by Carl Van Doren (the version that Charlie Munger recommends) and it's patently obvious that Franklin was one of a kind for many different reasons. His morning routine was just one of the things that made him a great man.

Thankfully, we actually have his morning routine:


Rise, wash, and address Powerful Goodness! Contrive a day's business, and take the resolution of the day; prosecute the present study, and breakfast.

Making A Difference

The following comes from WhatWillMatter.com.

“It’s true I am only one, but I am one and the fact that I cannot do everything will not prevent me from doing what I can do.” – Edward Everett Hale 

What can be more meaningful and fulfilling than making a positive difference in this world by making a difference in the lives we touch? It is the essence of living a life that matter. As the following story illustrates it is so much easier than it we might think and its something we all can do every day of the year. 

Marta was a hard-working single mother. When her minister sermonized about “living a life that matters,” she worried that working to raise her kids and going to church wasn’t enough. So, on the bus to work she made a list of other jobs she could do and volunteer work she could try. 

Sylvia, an elderly woman, saw the worry on Marta’s face and asked what was wrong. Marta explained her problem. Sylvia said, “Oh my, did your minister say you weren’t doing enough?” 

“No,” Marta said, “But I know I’m not living a life that matters and i want to.” 

“You don’t have to change jobs or do more volunteer work,” Sylvia consoled her. “It’s enough that you’re a good mother. But if you want to do more, think about what you can do while doing what you already do. It’s not about what you do, but how you do it.” 

“You don’t understand,” Marta said. “I sell hamburgers. How do I make that significant?” 

“How many people do you deal with every day?” Sylvia asked. 

“Two to three hundred.” 

“Well, what if you set out to cheer, encourage, teach or inspire as many of those people as you could? A compliment, a bit of advice, a cheerful hello or a warm smile can start a chain reaction that lights up lives like an endless string of Christmas bulbs.” 

“But that’s just being nice,” Marta protested. 

“Right,” said Sylvia, “Niceness can change lives.” 

Marta looked at the old woman. “What do you do?” 

“I was a housekeeper until I retired,” Sylvia said. “Now I just ride the bus talking to people.” 

Sylvia made a difference in Marta’s life simply by helping her look at things differently so the next day at work she went out of her way to encourage others with a kind word. Her goal was to make someone feel good about themselves and smile. She particularly began to enjoy the moments when someone actually said thank you and she got better at it. 

Toward the end of the first day of her campaign to make a difference through kindness she saw a woman in line holding a baby in one arm and struggling to keep her two other children in control. She was clearly frazzled when she got to Marta’s window to order her food. Marta said, “I couldn’t help but notice that you are an extraordinary mother. It is so clear you are worn out but your love for your children and your consideration for others is amazing. Thank You.” 

The mom’s face changed almost instantly and she replied, “I can’t tell you how much that means to me. You have made my day.” After another moment she added, “no you didn’t just make my day, you affirmed my life. Thank you.” 

Marta was filled with a sense of gratitude and she couldn’t wait to tell Sylvia on the bus ride home. 

“People don’t always remember what you say or even what you do, but they always remember how you made them feel.” – Maya Angelou

Why the Most Successful People Have Haters

"They can doubt you, they can fight you -- but never let them stop you."

Picture yourself standing in the middle of a crowded stadium. You're in the heat of competition in front of 100,000 screaming fans, and at least half of them aren't cheering for you. Some of that 50 percent even hate you. They don't just hate you, they are letting you know why and precisely how much they despise you. Maybe even with disgusting comments about your family.

You actually enter into your own personal version of that stadium every day in the sport of business. They're called haters, and you probably don't have enough of them. That's right, you read that correctly. I am suggesting you need more haters. Why? Because there's a direct correlation between the amount of success you enjoy and the number of haters you have. 

Many experts will tell you that if you want to achieve greatness, you have to be willing to be hated. I spin it a little differently. You should love the hate, because that means you're on the right track. There's a big difference between willingness and love. Every top achiever has their critics -- even Michael Jordan to Steve Jobs did -- yet they were still wildly successful. 

Haters are people who think they know the route to success, but they never actually get in the plane to fly themselves there. 

Who do haters hate? 
Successful people. You don't see nobodies go on the Jimmy Kimmel Show and read mean tweets about themselves -- it's called celebrity mean tweets for a reason. We all have our own version of Kimmel's celebrity mean tweets, and with technology today it takes the form of not just social media but also Yelp and Amazon reviews and the comment section of articles. 

When I published my most popular article, What Dating A Model Taught Me About Chasing Opportunities, I was called everything from a sexist pig, to other unmentionables which the website deleted and my email inbox was flooded with people saying I should be fired as a columnist. Apparently a couple readers were asleep in school during the lesson on analogies. Some great hater comments included: "reading this made me cringe", "this is stupid", "face palm", "waste of time", and "he's extremely shallow". 

My personal favorite was: "Objectification of women, and yes, the analogy / metaphor stinks. Can't believe that the editors posted this. Wake up and smell the coffee. If they replaced model with CFO, or something that involved some brains, or personality, then I could agree. If we want people to aspire something, then don't put us in the dark ages." 

There's absolute value in having haters. Gene Siskel, of the legendary movie critics Siskel and Ebert, gave a poor review to the blockbuster movie The Silence of the Lambs -- he absolutely hated it. The Silence of the Lambs went on to win an Oscar. Rolling Stone magazine gave Nirvana's album Nevermind just three stars. Then after being publicly humiliated about their review, they later admitted it was one of the top twenty albums of all time. Rolling Stone didn't like Led Zeppelin back in the seventies or Jimi Hendrix before that. They admitted in all three of those reviews that they probably did indeed misjudge them. 

This all reinforces the fact that we need haters in our businesses, but we cannot get caught up on what critics says about our work. There's value in haters -- even in the one-star Amazon reviewers as it turns out, because they are an authentic reflection of our cultural norms. That's right, take solace in the fact that haters are the norm. 

Why do haters hate? 
Criticism is self-hate turned outward. I believe hate is often a sign of weakness, envy and fear. Haters hate on you because you're doing what they cannot, will not or are too afraid to attempt. 

Haters are a natural part of the growth of your business. When you're new there will be critics, when you're good there will be haters, and when you're excellent they will turn into admirers. The question is: Are you willing to be attacked and criticized as a person to grow your brand? 

There is one way to avoid having haters. Sit on the sidelines, do nothing, don't set goals, be average and no one will judge or hate you. 

Criticism and hate are the price you pay for taking your business to the big time. So don't let the sound of your haters overwhelm you, you only give them power if you listen to what they say. Ignore the noise and use your haters as fuel for the fire. They're hating you because you're on to something and are doing big things. In a way they are one of the greatest forms of feedback you can get. 

Case in point: The more Trump haters come out of the woodwork, the more his numbers increase in the polls. Newsweek even commented that he had more haters than voters. Howard Stern's haters actually listen to his radio show longer than his fans do on a daily basis, because they want to hear what he would say next. Lots of haters equals lots of success. 

Remember: They can doubt you, they can fight you -- but never let them stop you. 

Be YOUR Best, 
John Brubaker
www.CoachBru.com


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Do You Have a Beginner's Mind?

“In the beginner’s mind, there are many possibilities. In the expert’s mind, there are few.” 
-- Shunryu Suzuki

We all get into ruts in our lives. Even routines that once served us well can turn into ruts if we’re not vigilant. 

You can tell the difference between whether your routines have morphed into ruts by asking yourself, “If I were starting from scratch, is this the way I would design my routine?” 

It’s helpful to ask that question often and in every area of your life. Think about the implications at work if managers looked at their business processes and asked, “If we weren’t already doing things this way, would we choose to do it like this?” 

Ask the question when it comes to how you interact with your spouse, significant other, or friends. 

If you find the answer to the question is no, don’t waste time beating yourself up for doing it that way, simply design a new routine, process, or approach. 

Today, remember that it’s important to regularly look at things with a beginner’s mind, which opens you up to possibilities and growth. 

Win Your Day! 
Steve Gilbert 

*If you are not on Steve Gilbert’s Win Your Day! email list, but would like to be added, please email him at winyourday@gmail.com

Streetwear and Des Moines Collide

We’ve been working with Fugitive Apparel Co on a new line of Des Moines specific streetwear items including the newly released Contenders hoodie, which is available now in store or online at Fugitive Apparel Co.

The inspiration stems from the uniforms worn by Team USA in the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona. The 1992 Men’s Olympic Basketball Team, nicknamed the Dream Team (our favorite hashtag), was one of the greatest basketball teams to represent the United States on the Olympic stage. Not only were they an unbeatable squad, their uniforms were top notch.

Although, there isn’t a direct Iowa or Des Moines tie to the Dream Team (Mike Krzyzewski nearly came to Iowa State), we felt this design would be well received around the metro and so far, it has. Go pick one up!